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Seven Things to Consider Before Buying School Furniture

There's a Chinese proverb, which says, "Do not confine your children to your own learning, for they were born in another time."

buying school furniture

This aphorism is likely more true of today's children than of any previous generation. Thanks in large part to rapid technological 

growth, the modern child (and the modern classroom) bears little resemblance to the past.

While traditional teaching consisted of the "stand and teach/sit still and listen" format, today's teachers understand this isn't ideal. Instead, educators must work harder to engage students in active learning, knowing that people learn best by doing.

And since we're seeing more movement and collaboration in the classroom, functional furniture is crucial. So, before investing in new school furniture, here are seven factors to consider:

Health and Safety

Even the best educators will struggle to effectively engage students in an unsafe classroom. As such, student safety unsurprisingly tops our list of priorities. Not only should furniture be sturdy (IE. students can't easily tip over chairs), but it should also be constructed from non-toxic materials.

Ergonomics

Nowhere is proper ergonomics more important than in the classroom. Students come in all shapes and sizes and it's important to respect such diversity. To address the discrepancies between students, desks and chairs come in adjustable heights.

Flexibility

From the workplace to the classroom, there's been a shift toward flexible workstations. 

People learn (and work) best in a variety of settings, and what's best for one will be far from ideal for another. Instead of purchasing identical furniture for every student, consider a mixture.

For many, the traditionally structured desk and chair will function perfectly.

However, some students need to move and fidget more, in which case, chairs that bounce or tilt will support better concentration. Giving students a choice in furniture empowers them to determine how they learn best.

Mobility and Function

Today's educators don't spend the entire day simply lecturing the students (while expecting them to sit still and listen). Rather, to promote engaged learning, they're actively involving their students in the learning process. From one hour to the next, the classroom may transform from a historic battle site to a boardroom to a science lab and finally into a standard classroom. With that in mind, classroom furniture should move and reconfigure smoothly between lessons.

Value

The budget carries a lot of weight when it comes to purchasing classroom furniture. Of course, it'd be great to outfit the school in the best money can buy; but as we all know, there are a finite amount of resources in the education system. As a result, getting the best value for price is extremely important. Materials should be scratch resistant, easy to clean, and durable enough to withstand constant use and abuse.

Service

Of course, we never want to plan for issues after making such a large investment; but in the event of a problem, it's wise to have backup. This is especially true in the case of classroom furniture, which sees a lot of wear and tear. Product warranty, service quality, and even delivery time should factor into the purchase decision.

Technology

The classroom is undergoing major changes as technology use seeps into teaching methodologies. For this reason, much of the furniture being designed for schools makes integration seamless. It makes financial and practical sense to invest in furniture that will accommodate technological growth in years to come.

Contact us today to learn how we can help with your school furniture needs.

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What People Say About CDI Spaces

I have to let you know how amazing our snaking Learning Common space has become. It is a joy seeing the full furniture vision arrive and being used by kids.

Todd Hennig. Principal.
Cooper’s Crossing School